Risks That Can Derail Your Retirement

by Sebastian Friedman
Derail Your Retirement

Many of us carefully plan for our retirement. But even the most consistent retirement planners can still have a wrench thrown in their plans. Anything can happen, the stock market could crash, your partner could end up suddenly dying or you could suffer from a lengthy illness. Retirement itself can prose plenty of risks to your financial security. Therefore, I am going to highlight some of the potential issues that could arise in more detail so you can create a backup plan so you can keep enjoying your retirement.

Employment Risk

Often, those who have retired decide to supplement their income by gaining or continuing part-time or full-time employment during retirement. In fact, some organizations prefer to hire older workers because of their consistently and maturity. However, success in the job market may also depend on technical skills that retirees might struggle to gain or maintain.

Employment prospects among retirees are different for everyone though. If we consider a field of varying skillsets and changes in health, family, or economic conditions.

Choosing the point to retire is critical to retirement planning. Opting to retire later will help you save more, but there is no certainty that appropriate employment will be there for you. Working part-time is an option work considering instead of full-time employment because they are often easier to acquire.

Longevity Risk

Running out of money before they pass away is a key concern for most retirees. Longevity risk is an even bigger issue today, as life expectancy has increased. The life expectancy at retirement is just an average age, with approximately half of retirees living longer and a few living past the ripe old age of 100.

Planning for only enough income to live to your supposed life expectancy will be enough for about half of retirees. However, the downside of living longer is increased exposure to other risks that we will continue to discuss throughout this article.

Those who are managing their own retirement funds over a lifetime must perform a complicated balancing act. Being careful and restricting spending might needlessly affect your lifestyle – especially in early retirement when you are in the best shape you will be for your entire retirement. But spending too much does risk running out of money.

Death of a Spouse

Grief over a spouse’s death or terminal illness contributes to unfortunately high rate of suicide and depression among the elderly. Then there are the financial implications. A partner’s death can lead to a reduction in pension benefits or bring additional financial burdens you must carry yourself instead of having a second income to support you. These can include lingering medical bills and debts. In addition, the surviving partner may not be able or willing to understand and manage their finances which could lead them to be vulnerable to abuse from carers and even family members.

This is a very real possibility for so many people so it would be smart to look into a long-term care insurance plan. These kinds of financial vehicles are available to protect the income and needs of those who remain after the passing of a partner. Estate planning is also something else that needs to be kept in mind for survivors.

Ultimately, there are plenty of real risks that retirees face in this world. Improved life expectancies has made it harder to stretch out that pension fund. Meaning, those who often look to enjoy their retirement cannot because of the fear of living beyond their means. Employment can also be a challenge at an older age, alongside with dealing with the death of a partner. But with the right backup plan retirees can get the support they need.

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